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National AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler to Stand with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley to call on Congress to Reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership Trade Agreement

National AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler To Stand With Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley To Call On Congress To Reject The Trans-Pacific Partnership Trade Agreement

Ill-conceived trade deal would hurt women, wages.

Moraine, OH – National AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, the second highest ranking officer in the American labor movement, will attend a press conference on Tuesday, May 3 with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley to call on Congress to reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal.

The TPP is a trade deal made by corporations, for corporations. Shuler and Whaley will be joined by area working people to make the case that our trade agreements should create good jobs in America, and reward working people with a decent life. The TPP fails these goals.  Just as past trade deals have failed working people in Dayton and across Ohio, the TPP would further stack the deck against working people here, especially working women.

Who:   National AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, Dayton area working women.

What: Press conference calling on Congress to reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) deal

Where: Former Harrison Radiator Plant Site 3250 Dryden Road, Moraine, OH 45439

When: Tuesday May 3, 2016 @ 10:00AM

About the former Harrison Radiator plant: The plant was a supplier of auto air conditioning units to GM, and had supplied parts to the former GM Moraine “Truck and Bus” plant, which is just to the East of where the Harrison plant used to stand.  All that remains of the Harrison plant today are the turnstiles formerly used by workers to enter the facility.

In the 1980’s, the Harrison plant was home to over 4,500 workers.   Under the U.S. “free trade” regime starting in the 1990’s, the plant began losing work to competitors in Brazil, Mexico and Japan, where goods were produced with low-cost labor. Eventually the plant lost much of its business to these overseas competitors, contributing to its closure in 2008.

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